Denial Hotspots and the facts

Vast majority of UK accept climate change is real

So most people in the UK do know that we have caused a problem.

But – Old men in the East Midlands are less likely to accept scientists’ evidence than young women in the South-east

But P.S.
How our desires shape our beliefs

Well, you can imagine my dismay when I discovered that all these experiments pointed to the reality that people are not driven by facts. They are not enough to alter beliefs, and they are practically useless for motivating action. Consider climate change: there are mountains of data indicating that humans play a role in warming the globe, yet approximately 50% of the world’s population doesn’t believe it.

The problem with an approach that prioritises information is that it ignores the core of what makes us human: our motives, our fears, our hopes, our desires, our prior beliefs.

“Why should the Devil have all the best tunes?”
We need to work on some tunes. This is why religions do so well, they have deep history, community and good stories. Some sects have wonderful tunes.

How to deal with weather extremes

I know developments in virtual reality are big in the United States, but –

The Trump administration’s solution to climate change: ban the term

In real reality –

Climate change to cause humid heatwaves that will kill even healthy people

The new analysis assesses the impact of climate change on the deadly combination of heat and humidity, measured as the “wet bulb” temperature (WBT). Once this reaches 35C, the human body cannot cool itself by sweating and even fit people sitting in the shade will die within six hours.

Largest dead zone ever hits the Gulf of Mexico

While this year’s dead zone is record-shattering, it’s likely that these zones will only increase in size in the future, as climate change drives more intense precipitation and, in turn, more nutrient pollution. A recent study in Science found that increased precipitation from climate change would translate to a 19 percent increase in nitrogen — a nutrient found in both manure and agricultural fertilizer — in Americans rivers by the end of the century.

Are we being too timid in telling people how bad it might be?
The Uninhabitable Earth

It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today.

Worth a debate,
Or is it too late?
A Defense of Climate Tragedy, or What the Scientists Got Wrong about “The Uninhabitable Earth”

This is an essay about the furor over David Wallace-Wells’ New York Magazine article “The Uninhabitable Earth,” which conjures a specter of a planet so ruined by global warming in our children’s lifetimes that it no longer sustains, but destroys human life. By his own account, Wallace-Wells (DWW from here on out) wrote “The Uninhabitable Earth” to frighten people out of their complacency and to inspire them to clamor loudly for immediate action to halt climate change in its petrifying tracks.

New storage technologies

Here is an example of creative thought in battery technology. I expect many thousands more of such new technologies to help us stop emitting CO2.

Longer-lasting batteries get a boost from molecular pulleys

Abstract from Highly elastic binders integrating polyrotaxanes for silicon microparticle anodes in lithium ion batteries

Lithium-ion batteries with ever-increasing energy densities are needed for batteries for advanced devices and all-electric vehicles. Silicon has been highlighted as a promising anode material because of its superior specific capacity. During repeated charge-discharge cycles, silicon undergoes huge volume changes. This limits cycle life via particle pulverization and an unstable electrode-electrolyte interface, especially when the particle sizes are in the micrometer range. We show that the incorporation of 5 weight % polyrotaxane to conventional polyacrylic acid binder imparts extraordinary elasticity to the polymer network originating from the ring sliding motion of polyrotaxane. This binder combination keeps even pulverized silicon particles coalesced without disintegration, enabling stable cycle life for silicon microparticle anodes at commercial-level areal capacities.

About one thousand days

Do you remember 8th March 2014, that’s when Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared. That’s a mere three years ago. That’s the timescale on which we have make a real change on CO2 emissions.

World has three years left to stop dangerous climate change

While the greenhouse gases poured into the atmosphere over the last two centuries have only gradually taken effect, future changes are likely to be faster, scientists fear. Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre said: “We have been blessed by a remarkably resilient planet over the past 100 years, able to absorb most of our climate abuse. Now we have reached the end of this era, and need to bend the global curve of emissions immediately, to avoid unmanageable outcomes for our modern world.”

True wealth creation

A Himalayan problem –

Each winter, titanic shelves of ice form at high altitudes and melt throughout the spring, flowing downwards into the streams that are the veins of civilisation on the mountain. Lately, that cycle has faltered.

Solved by a true wealth creator with Himalayan imagination –

The ice stupas of Ladakh: solving water crisis in the high desert of Himalaya

The conical shape hit a sweet spot, maximising the volume of ice that can be “grown”, while minimising the surface area exposed to direct sunlight. That means it keeps melting well into the spring, releasing up to 5,000 litres of water each day by “storing it in the sky”, Wangchuk says.

It also has the benefit of resembling the Buddhist stupas – religious sites used for meditation and worship – that dot the landscape, a crucial point for 50-year-old. “Because it resembles something we have in our tradition, it is made more close to the population, to their hearts,” he says.

A horror movie that’s real

The idea of tipping points becomes graphically real.

7,000 massive methane gas bubbles under the Russian permafrost could explode anytime

Crater formed from underground methane explosion in Siberia.
Crater formed from underground methane explosion in Siberia.

CREDIT: Siberia Times

This discovery is especially worrisome for three reasons. First, methane traps 86 times as much heat as CO2 over a 20-year period. Thawing permafrost creates both CO2 and methane (CH4), but most models of thawing permafrost assume only CO2 is created. If, as it appears, a lot of methane is being generated, then we’ll see even more extra warming than scientists have projected.

Second, a recent study found global warming will defrost much more permafrost than we thought.

If you want to feel queasy: Underground methane bubbles

Renal change

Expect more unexpected problems from global warming.

Climate change is turning dehydration into a deadly disease

Researchers currently classify the new form of chronic kidney disease as “climate-sensitive”, which means that climate is one ingredient contributing to the epidemic. As temperatures continue to rise, many such climate-sensitive diseases will become climate-driven, and monitoring and bringing attention to them will become even more crucial.