In praise of China

China is not only doing R&D in technologies such as solar, wind & nuclear, it is also developing the legal framework to move to a sustainable society. This ties in well with the previous post Sustainability

‘My job is to clean up the environment. China really wants to do that’

Environmental lawyer James Thornton says China’s ‘ecological civilisation’ concept is the best response to the world’s environmental crisis

First invited to Beijing in 2014 to help implement China’s new law allowing NGOs to sue polluting companies for the first time, Thornton has seen how serious the world’s biggest polluter is about addressing its environmental problems. He believes their concept of “ecological civilisation” is the best formulation he’s heard for the new environmental story we must tell.

“Facing the ruin of their environment, the Chinese looked hard and amended their constitution. This core document now calls for the building of an ecological civilisation,” he says. “We built an agricultural, then an industrial, and now must build an ecological civilisation.”

“I have no cynicism about whether they mean to do it. My job is to try and clean up the environment for future generations. The Chinese really want to do that.” This task, apparently insurmountable for the west, is made possible by China’s 2,500-year tradition of centralised government.

Sustainability

This is an inspiring business.

Chinese textile business booms after betting on sustainability

But neither Lingyong nor Lingyan were satisfied with solely improving their own environmental performance. They realized that collective action is the only way to really mitigate water-related risks to their business so they teamed up with the Industrial Park Committee and WWF to take the next critical steps on the path to water stewardship — engaging with other water users in the same industrial park and river basin to take collective action.

versus, the non-sustainable:

Plastic fibres found in tap water around the world, study reveals

Mahon said there were two principal concerns: very small plastic particles and the chemicals or pathogens that microplastics can harbour. “If the fibres are there, it is possible that the nanoparticles are there too that we can’t measure,” she said. “Once they are in the nanometre range they can really penetrate a cell and that means they can penetrate organs, and that would be worrying.” The Orb analyses caught particles of more than 2.5 microns in size, 2,500 times bigger than a nanometre.

Microplastics can attract bacteria found in sewage, Mahon said: “Some studies have shown there are more harmful pathogens on microplastics downstream of wastewater treatment plants.”

I hope that Lingyong and Lingyan will look into this, there is clearly an enormous opportunity for new technologies.

New storage technologies

Here is an example of creative thought in battery technology. I expect many thousands more of such new technologies to help us stop emitting CO2.

Longer-lasting batteries get a boost from molecular pulleys

Abstract from Highly elastic binders integrating polyrotaxanes for silicon microparticle anodes in lithium ion batteries

Lithium-ion batteries with ever-increasing energy densities are needed for batteries for advanced devices and all-electric vehicles. Silicon has been highlighted as a promising anode material because of its superior specific capacity. During repeated charge-discharge cycles, silicon undergoes huge volume changes. This limits cycle life via particle pulverization and an unstable electrode-electrolyte interface, especially when the particle sizes are in the micrometer range. We show that the incorporation of 5 weight % polyrotaxane to conventional polyacrylic acid binder imparts extraordinary elasticity to the polymer network originating from the ring sliding motion of polyrotaxane. This binder combination keeps even pulverized silicon particles coalesced without disintegration, enabling stable cycle life for silicon microparticle anodes at commercial-level areal capacities.

It’s happening anyway

Whatever the climate deniers are doing & saying, the change over to renewables is happening anyway.

States betting on giant batteries to cut carbon

A growing number of states are requiring large batteries to be used to store electricity to help expand wind and solar power. The trend is catching on quickly as at least three states have created energy storage targets or incentives so far this year.

Lawmakers in New York passed a bill last week requiring the state to create an energy storage target. Nevada passed a bill incentivizing energy storage in May, and Maryland passed an energy storage tax credit in April. Those measures follow California, Oregon, and Massachusetts, which have mandates for electricity storage in batteries.

Trump that!

It’s official, I am sane

And, many other people who though this project ridiculous.

Spending watchdog condemns ‘risky and expensive’ Hinkley Point

Generations of British consumers have been locked into a “risky and expensive” project by the UK’s subsidy deal for a new nuclear power station at Hinkley Point in Somerset, according to a damning report by the spending watchdog.

Need I say more?

It looks like solar/wind power will banish fossil fuels

‘Spectacular’ drop in renewable energy costs leads to record global boost

But we still have to move faster.

Lins said the switch to green energy needed to speed up and, crucially, start converting transport, heating and cooling to renewable sources. “The world is in a race against time,” she said.

Christiana Figueres, the former UN climate chief who delivered the Paris agreement and is now convenor of Mission 2020, said: “The economic case for renewables as the backbone of our global energy system is increasingly clear and proven. Offering ever greater bang-for-buck, renewables are quite simply the cheapest way to generate energy in an ever-growing number of countries.”

Big battery storage is coming

Welsh battery scheme may aid growth of green energy

Solar power has grown rapidly in the last seven years, going from almost nothing to 11GW of capacity, meaning it now regularly provides more power than Britain’s last coal plants. There is also 15GW of wind power, a figure that will climb this year as major offshore windfarms come online.